Polymetic Heroism in the Apologue

Hamish Gavin Douglas Williams

Abstract


In the Homeric Apologue, success is garnered by acts of trickery which help the hero overcome foes/surpass obstacles, while victims of tricks are depicted in helpless, supplicative, soporific, or weakened states. In tandem with this, I observe how the absence of polymetic prowess, demonstrated either through a focus on isolated bie (physical strength) or through what is otherwise represented as a certain mindlessness or foolishness, leads to failure in the interactions. The Apologue has the important function in the Odyssey of solidifying Odysseus’ outstanding quality as a polymetic hero, acting as a proving ground for this means of heroic achievement.


Keywords


Homer; Odysseus; Heroism; Metis; Tricks

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References


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/63-0-981

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