AN ANCIENT EXAMPLE OF LITERARY BLACKMAIL

C Coetzee

Abstract


Towards the end of his life and especially after his exile in 58-57
BC, Cicero’s publication program accelerated. While he aimed to
promote his own glory, he had to do so in an environment where
writing about oneself attracted censure. This article explores some of
the ways in which Cicero tries to overcome this limitation. These
include writing about himself indirectly, defending artists in court,
soliciting historians to include his role as consul in their works and
even attempts at public literary blackmail, specifically towards his
prolific contemporary, Marcus Terentius Varro.

Keywords


Cicero; Varro; De legibus; Pro Archia; Academica; publication; glory

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/63-0-994

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ISSN 2079-2883 (online); ISSN 0303-1896 (print)

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