DRAGONOLOGY: THE IDEA OF THE DRAGON AMONG THE GREEKS AND THE ZULU

M. Kirby-Hirst

Abstract


The dragon is one of the most ubiquitous of images — from its appearance in the dreams of individuals to the legendary works of men like J R R Tolkien — it is known across the world but never viewed in the same way. This article takes a Jungian psychoanalytic approach to the dragon as symbol, and juxtaposes two distinct perspectives on the dragon, that of the ancient Greeks (the mythic dragons Typhon and Python in particular) and the Zulu people of South Africa (with special attention given to the place of the python as a possible “dragon” in the practice of divination), in an effort to better understand the creature’s significance to these two cultures and to the world at large.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/55-0-18

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ISSN 2079-2883 (online); ISSN 0303-1896 (print)

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