THE PLOT OF THE "TYPICAL" ROMAN COMEDY: ANCIENT SCOPE AND MODERN FOCUS

Z. M. Packman

Abstract


One point of continuing interest in the study of the Roman comic writers is the
unequal status of male and female in the tales of young love so often encountered in
the texts. While the young man in love is almost invariably both free and of citizen
class, the young woman with whom he wishes to be united, reunited,. or continuing in
union is sometimes both free and of citizen class, sometimes free but not of citizen
class, and sometimes a slave. In a few cases a young woman apparently belonging to
one of the latter two classes turns out to belong in fact to the first. The problems
attendant upon each love story, and to some extent the outcome of each, depend in
large part on the status of the young woman involved.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/43-0-180

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ISSN 2079-2883 (online); ISSN 0303-1896 (print)

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