GOVERNANCE IN PTOLEMAIC EGYPT, THE FIRST HUNDRED YEARS: A CASE OF IMPERIALISM?

J. Adler

Abstract


This article investigates the nature of governance in Ptolemaic Egypt during the first 100 years of their rule. It proposes that this governance was Imperialist and exploitative in nature and that the Macedonian Greeks acted as the master race while their Egyptian subjects were either collaborators in this exploitation (a small minority of no more than 2.5%) or the exploited.

In order to substantiate this submission, the nature of concepts such as imperialism, colonialism and colonization are defined and explored. Where applicable, comparisons are made with modern empires. The institutions of empire and the racist nature of Ptolemaic rule are investigated while the economic measures instituted to ensure maximum profit for the imperialists, are also examined.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/49-0-84

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ISSN 2079-2883 (online); ISSN 0303-1896 (print)

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