RHETORIC AND THE FEMININE CHARACTER: CICERO’S PORTRAYAL OF SASSIA , CLODIA AND FULVIA

S. Ige

Abstract


The role of women in the ancient world has been extensively debated and a significant amount of work has been done in this area. Included in the texts that have received attention are Cicero’s speeches which refer to women. All the women who feature in Cicero’s speeches were those who have been acknowledged to have made their presence felt in the Roman public domain. Although Roman society regulated its socio-political activities around masculine values, it is nevertheless difficult to explain why so few women appear in such a voluminous corpus like Cicero’s.1 What is certain is that Ciceronian rhetoric is characterised by the use of invective and vituperation.2 In this article, I shall argue that the women who were negatively portrayed in Cicero’s speeches were victims of an already standardised form of communication within the hegemonic male order that dominated the Roman public domain in first century BC.

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/48-0-98

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2079-2883 (online); ISSN 0303-1896 (print)

Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2011.

http://akroterion.journals.ac.za/public/site/images/scholar/g3010_768

Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help