CHILD PSYCHOLOGY IN THE ANCIENT WORLD: QUINTILIAN AND AUGUSTINE ON KINDERGARTEN EDUCATION

Marilese Van Nieuwenhuizen, Nadine Brand, Jo-Marie Claassen

Abstract


Quintilian, as the first publicly remunerated teacher of rhetoric at Rome, occupies a unique
place in the history of Classical education. His remuneration (a thousand gold pieces per
annum) set a standard few Latin teachers have subsequently achieved. That is, however,
not his chief claim to fame. His handbook on education, the Institutio Oratoria, in twelve
books, is a model of thoroughness, treating of every topic, from the child's earliest
learning experiences! to what may be considered a complete syllabus for a combined
liberal university course in the humanities and sciences. It is also a handbook on good
teacher-pupil relationships, parent-teacher interaction and educational ethics. It touches on
all aspects of teacher conduct, even the most suitable age at which a sensible man would
retire.

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.7445/39-1-527

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.



ISSN 2079-2883 (online); ISSN 0303-1896 (print)

Powered by OJS and hosted by Stellenbosch University Library and Information Service since 2011.

http://akroterion.journals.ac.za/public/site/images/scholar/g3010_768

Disclaimer:

This journal is hosted by the SU LIS on request of the journal owner/editor. The SU LIS takes no responsibility for the content published within this journal, and disclaim all liability arising out of the use of or inability to use the information contained herein. We assume no responsibility, and shall not be liable for any breaches of agreement with other publishers/hosts.

SUNJournals Help